Thee thou thine

Our language is muddy in the English language when it comes to the 2nd singular pronoun. Meaning, we use the same word for both singular and plural. The best “translation” of the Bible is one that avoids muddying, rather follows a Biblical standard from the word of God. The word of prophecy is not of private interpretation. It is absolutely impossible to do the Bible justice by “translating” it into the usage applied in street vernacular.

The Bible is not so muddy. See this next link to understand how distinguishing you-singular and you-plural in the KJB makes it much more understandable, whereas others are much more ambiguous:

http://www.ecclesia.org/truth/thou.html

More than one dictionary will inform you that these words were gone from everyday speech long before the KJB came along.

Even at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thou you’ll find this:

One notable consequence of the decline in use of the second person singular pronouns thou, thy, and thee is the obfuscation of certain sociocultural elements of Early Modern English texts, such as many character interactions in Shakespeare‘s plays. In Richard III, for instance, the conversation between the Duke of Clarence and the two murderers takes on a very different tone if it is read in light of the social connotations of the pronouns used by the characters.[11]

and…

As William Tyndale translated the Bible into English in the early 16th century, he sought to preserve the singular and plural distinctions that he found in his Hebrew and Greek originals. Therefore, he consistently used thou for the singular and ye for the plural regardless of the relative status of the speaker and the addressee. By doing so, he probably saved thou from utter obscurity and gave it an air of solemnity that sharply distinguished it from its original meaning.[2] Tyndale’s usage was imitated in the King James Bible, and remained familiar because of that translation.[13]

They say it’s still used in some places. Here next is a link to a simple conjugation table:

http://alt-usage-english.org/pronoun_paradigms.html

Peter admonishes us to desire the “sincere milk” of the word. We go right by that verse, I always have until I discovered the issue of Bible versions.

1 Peter 2:2 As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby:

See the dictionary definition of “sincere” below. Diluting the singular-plural distinction is an adulteration of the Bible in English.

sin·cere (sn-sîr) adj. sin·cer·er, sin·cer·est 1. Not feigned or affected; genuine: sincere indignation.
2. Being without hypocrisy or pretense; true: a sincere friend.
3. Archaic Pure; unadulterated.

1 Peter 2:2  As newborn babes, desire the sincere milk of the word, that ye may grow thereby.

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